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Dalia Truskaite – installation “ABOUT” and the Estonian Glass Art exhibition “DARKENING”

2018 November 21 @ 17:00 - 2019 January 12 @ 12:00

ABOUT

Installation by Dalia Truskiatė

About the existence, absence, slipping from hands, hope, loss, emptiness, winter, wind, waft, a missed opportunity, glance, time, transformation, change, faith, moment, eternity, light, ……. about what’s in the air, what we feel… but fail to express.

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PIMENEMINE

Darkening

An exhibition of glass art from Estonia
Participants: Erki Kannus, Merle Kannus, Kati Kerstna, Herbert Orgusaar, Kairi Orgusaar

November’s here again; the time of year when light deserts us. Two schools of thought suggest two opposite coping strategies: one says to turn up the lights; the second advises to face and march straight through the darkness. In this exhibition, a group of Estonian artists aim to show examples of both, so the viewer can compare, and see which one works best.

For Kairi Orgusaar, glass is a medium for working with light. This time, Light becomes the title of her recent work – one that portrays the unique flavor of light found in the Estonian wilderness, from the endlass days of Midsummer to the winter dark. Her other work, Inner Beauty, preserves a poem inside a tiny glass bead.

Kati Kerstna points out reasons to be concerned for the future of Planet Earth. In works titled Trust and Anomalies, she hints that despair is just around the corner, yet a smidgen of hope is needed to survive.  

Erki Kannus invites you to touch a series of voluptuous glass objects, even if just to see what sound they make. For Me, You are a Black Box, and Vital Parts are the titles of his works. Eros, the Greek god of love and lust, has ever walked the line between dark and light.

Merle Kannus searches through stories of her life, finding darkness in herself and others. Small Conflicts and Miss Snow White record the moral dilemmas of the average schoolgirl.

Herbert Orgusaar brings a chandelier to illuminate the room. No ornament, no crime… or is beauty found in function?